1% increase

in energy consumption will create approximately 1% rise in the GDP index. - UNIDO, 2007

16% of the world's population

lives in Africa. Africa generates only 4 % of the global electricity supply. - UNIDO, 2007

3.5 million people

or a city of the size of Berlin die each year from water, sanitation and hygiene-related causes - WHO, 2008

60 % of African businesses

state that the lack of access to reliable power affects their operations. - ONE, 2013

7 out of 10 people

living in Sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to electricity. That's almost twice the population of the U.S. - ONE, 2013

A 10 % increase in girls

going to school increases a country's GDP by 3 %. 3 % of Kenya's GDP is 1,1 billion USD. - Mercy Corps, 2013 ; The World Bank, 2012

About 500 million Africans

do not have access to modern energy. This is similar to the entire population of the European Union. - UNIDO, 2007; Eurostat, 2013

Approx. 33% of the world's

rural population does not have access to electricity. This is almost 1/5 of the world's total population - The World Bank, IEA

Children in households with

electricity have, on average, an additional 2 years of schooling. For every year of education, wages increase by a worldwide average of 10%. - IEG, 2008; CARE 2011

Children who finish

secondary education, are 7 times less likely to contract HIV, as those who receive little or no education. - ONE, 2013

Indoor cooking

using traditional solid fuels cause up to 2 million deaths a year. - IEG, 2008

Lack of access to clean water

and sanitation kills approximately 100 children every hour. - UNICEF, WHO, 2009

On average, health clinics

with electricity are open 1 hour longer each day. - IEG, 2008

Rural electrification results

in a fertility reduction of 0.6 children - equivalent to a benefit of $100 per household. - IEG, 2008

The number of people

relying on biomass energy like wood and charcoal in Africa is expected to increase by a 1000% between 2000 and 2030. - UNIDO, 2009

  • APPROX 1.3 BILLION

    PEOPLE LIVE WITHOUT ACCESS TO ELECTRICITY TODAY

  • 80 countries

    have significant population size without access to electricity and untapped wind resources

  • Infant mortality rates

    are higher in countries with limited electricity access

  • Explore the potential of wind

  • Our data map highlights countries where large rural populations live without electricity access,
    have high infant mortality rates and yet have abundant wind resources.

0.00


Population

( in millions ).

World Bank 2010

0.00


Rural population

( in millions ).

World Bank 2010

0.00


Rural population without electricity

( in millions ).

IEA & World Bank 2010

yo!


Human Development, UNDP 2012

0.00


Infant Mortality per 1000 live births,
World Bank 2012.

0


Share of national surface area with wind speed > 7 m/s ( in %). Vestas 2013.

The Vision

Today, more than 1.3 billion people across the globe lack access to affordable and reliable electricity - with dramatic consequences for human health, education, and economic well-being. But more than 50 million of those live in areas with abundant wind resources.

Wind for prosperity takes its departure in 2011, when Vestas' CMO, Morten Albæk, had the idea to connect two data sets; wind data and areas with the highest level of child mortality. By combining these data sets, rural communities without access to reliable electricity but with an abundance of wind emerged, resulting in the vision: Wind for Prosperity.

Wind for Prosperity will create a world of new opportunities by accelerating access to clean water, healthcare, irrigation, education, communications infrastructure, and other social and economic benefits. It is different to most other corporate initiatives to alleviate poverty. The concept is commercially based and is more scalable and sustainable than efforts purely reliant on philanthropy and donations. It is business as a force for good.

1% increase

in energy consumption will create approximately 1% rise in the GDP index. - UNIDO, 2007

16% of the world's population

lives in Africa. Africa generates only 4 % of the global electricity supply. - UNIDO, 2007

3.5 million people

or a city of the size of Berlin die each year from water, sanitation and hygiene-related causes - WHO, 2008

60 % of African businesses

state that the lack of access to reliable power affects their operations. - ONE, 2013

7 out of 10 people

living in Sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to electricity. That's almost twice the population of the U.S. - ONE, 2013

A 10 % increase in girls

going to school increases a country's GDP by 3 %. 3 % of Kenya's GDP is 1,1 billion USD. - Mercy Corps, 2013 ; The World Bank, 2012

About 500 million Africans

do not have access to modern energy. This is similar to the entire population of the European Union. - UNIDO, 2007; Eurostat, 2013

Approx. 33% of the world's

rural population does not have access to electricity. This is almost 1/5 of the world's total population - The World Bank, IEA

Children in households with

electricity have, on average, an additional 2 years of schooling. For every year of education, wages increase by a worldwide average of 10%. - IEG, 2008; CARE 2011

Children who finish

secondary education, are 7 times less likely to contract HIV, as those who receive little or no education. - ONE, 2013

Indoor cooking

using traditional solid fuels cause up to 2 million deaths a year. - IEG, 2008

Lack of access to clean water

and sanitation kills approximately 100 children every hour. - UNICEF, WHO, 2009

On average, health clinics

with electricity are open 1 hour longer each day. - IEG, 2008

Rural electrification results

in a fertility reduction of 0.6 children - equivalent to a benefit of $100 per household. - IEG, 2008

The number of people

relying on biomass energy like wood and charcoal in Africa is expected to increase by a 1000% between 2000 and 2030. - UNIDO, 2009

Projects

Project

Kenya

Social

Impact

Local

Partners

  • Kenya
  • Social Impact
  • Local Partners

Population: 43 million (2012)

Income level: Low income

Kenya is a regional economic hub in East Africa. Agriculture has been the backbone of Kenya's economy, along with emerging industries like manufacturing and tourism.

Despite periods of inconsistent economic growth in the past, Kenya has been on a positive trend with growth rates higher than 5%. The prospects for the coming years are favourable and Kenya could be the first East African country to reach middle income status. Increasing exports and investment in transport and energy infrastructure will be important factors to sustain economic growth.

Kenya has favourable wind conditions and wind power projects are being developed in several regions. The first Vestas wind turbines in Kenya were installed at Ngong Hills, close to Nairobi, in 2008

A recent World Bank Economic Update highlights Kenya's contrasts and widespread inequalities. While the average Kenyan is healthier, more educated and receives better infrastructure services than a decade ago, a large fraction of the population continues to live in fragile conditions with sub-standard access to water, sanitation and energy.

The situation is particularly critical in the northern, north eastern and coastal regions where poverty levels and vulnerability are the highest.

The first Wind for Prosperity projects will centre on up to 13 Kenyan communities that are home to more than 200,000 people. The projects will supply electricity at least 30% below the current cost of diesel generation; and when fully implemented, will reduce diesel fuel use by more than 2,000 tons per year.

The Kenyan pilot projects are being developed by a newly-formed consortium, including Vestas, Frontier Investment Management (a private equity fund manager), and a local development partner. The Consortium is working closely with the Kenyan Ministry of Energy, Kenya Power and Lighting Company, and various government agencies to prepare the first installations in 2014.

Kenya

40.91

Population
( in millions ). World Bank 2010

31.27

Rural population

( in millions ).

World Bank 2010

29.77

Rural population without electricity

( in millions ).

IEA & World Bank 2010

LOW

Human Development, UNDP 2012

48.7

Infant Mortality per 1000 live births,
World Bank 2012.

21%

Share of national surface area with wind speed

> 7 m/s

( in %).

Vestas 2013.

Technology

Technology

Choice of technology driven by cost and reliability

The technical solution behind Wind for Prosperity is designed with affordability and reliability in mind. Wind for Prosperity brings proven technology to parts of the world where conditions to operate are harsh, where road infrastructure is limited and access to construction equipment is scarce.

In order to address these needs, a portfolio of wind turbines is required with a good range of outputs, operational reliability and favourable dimensions for transportation and erection.

At the core of the solution are some of the most robust wind turbines ever produced - the machines that built the foundation for the wind industry back in the day and played a critical role in the green revolution in the western world. Vestas has committed to sourcing and factory-refurbishing a selection of the most reliable models in their portfolio for deployment under the Wind for Prosperity brand.

The two flagship models presently considered for Wind for Prosperity deployment are the Vestas V27-225 kw and Vestas V47-660 kw. The models have been chosen due to their proven reliability and the operational qualities that make them perfectly suited to the conditions experienced in remote communities with limited infrastructure: easy to transport, simple to erect,reliable and simple to maintain - delivering a lower cost of energy. The wind turbines will be integrated into state-of-the-art wind-diesel power generation systems to provide stable, reliable electricity to isolated mini-grids.

View Photos

View Photos

Our Partners

Our Partners

Wind for Prosperity is proud to be supported by prosperity partners, without whom our ambitious vision of reaching 50 million people in energy poverty would not be possible.

  • Partners
  • Other Partners

Our local partner, DI Frontier Market Energy & Carbon Fund, is an investment fund with a unique focus on renewable energy and carbon credit generating assets in less developed emerging markets in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Visit Di Frontier >

Econet Wireless is a diversified telecommunications group with operations and investments in Africa, Europe, South America and the East Pacific Rim, offering products and services in the core areas of mobile and fixed telephony services, broadband, satellite and fibre optic networks.

Visit Econet >

ABB is a leader in power and automation technologies that enable utility, industry, and transport and infrastructure customers to improve their performance while lowering environmental impact. The ABB Group of companies operates in roughly 100 countries and employs about 145,000 people.

Visit ABB >

EPGE is a developer of renewable energy projects in the EMEA region. Notable projects include the 80 MW Chirnogeni Wind Farm in Romania which came into operation in December 2013 and the 117 MW Tafila Wind Farm in Jordan which is currently under construction, the first utility scale wind farm in the Middle East. EPGE is committed to sustainable developments making clean domestically generated electricity available to communities.

Visit EPGE >

Our global strategic partner, Masdar, is Abu Dhabi's multi-faceted renewable energy company with a mission to invest, incubate and establish a commercially viable new-energy industry in Abu Dhabi and around the world. Masdar also plays an important role in extending Abu Dhabi's energy leadership beyond hydrocarbons, thereby supporting economic diversification and human capital development. The company serves as a link between today's fossil-fuel economy and the energy economy of the future.

Visit Masdar >

Sundog Pictures is an independent production company pioneering branded documentaries. Sundog Pictures takes smart subjects and tells them in a simple and accessible way with surprising talent and visual flair, bringing new audiences to important subjects.

Visit Sundog Pictures >

The Carbon War Room accelerates the adoption of business solutions that reduce carbon emissions at gigaton scale and advance the low-carbon economy.

Visit Carbon War Room >

Our local partner, DI Frontier Market Energy & Carbon Fund, is an investment fund with a unique focus on renewable energy and carbon credit generating assets in less developed emerging markets in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Visit Di Frontier >

Business Case

Business Case

The Wind for Prosperity concept is commercially-based and thus more sustainable than efforts based on philanthropy, traditional development assistance or CSR motivations. It creates an opportunity for business, government, and financial institutions to combine their talents to improve people's lives and generate risk-adjusted returns for private investors.
In order to fulfill this potential in a rapid and sustainable manner, support through private funding is needed.

In the long run, the most sustainable and scalable deployment model for Wind for Prosperity is to attract private investors to own the generation facilities and manage the operations. Typically, this would manifest in a private company owning the wind turbines and selling the output to a local utility or governmental energy agency that in turn distributes to the end user. There are many benefits to such a private-public partnership. For example, it eliminates the need for governments to invest large sums of money and it involves multiple parties that have aligned interests for long-term success.

There are alternative deployment models. For instance, companies operating in remote areas off the grid could partner with Wind for Prosperity for reliable and affordable electricity, provided that a predefined part of the total output is delivered to neighbouring communities.

The cost of energy delivered by the Wind for Prosperity systems will vary depending on various factors including the quality of wind resources and the cost of installation. Providing power in off-grid remote and small community settings is relatively expensive due to lack of scale, and challenges involved in transportation and installation. However, where wind conditions are good, the wind hybrid system will supply electricity at least 30% below the alternative cost, based on diesel generation.

Investors, foundations and donors are invited to help accelerate the deployment of Wind for Prosperity for the benefit of the many communities that today live in energy poverty.



1% increase

in energy consumption will create approximately 1% rise in the GDP index. - UNIDO, 2007

16% of the world's population

lives in Africa. Africa generates only 4 % of the global electricity supply. - UNIDO, 2007

3.5 million people

or a city of the size of Berlin die each year from water, sanitation and hygiene-related causes - WHO, 2008

60 % of African businesses

state that the lack of access to reliable power affects their operations. - ONE, 2013

7 out of 10 people

living in Sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to electricity. That's almost twice the population of the U.S. - ONE, 2013

A 10 % increase in girls

going to school increases a country's GDP by 3 %. 3 % of Kenya's GDP is 1,1 billion USD. - Mercy Corps, 2013 ; The World Bank, 2012

About 500 million Africans

do not have access to modern energy. This is similar to the entire population of the European Union. - UNIDO, 2007; Eurostat, 2013

Approx. 33% of the world's

rural population does not have access to electricity. This is almost 1/5 of the world's total population - The World Bank, IEA

Children in households with

electricity have, on average, an additional 2 years of schooling. For every year of education, wages increase by a worldwide average of 10%. - IEG, 2008; CARE 2011

Children who finish

secondary education, are 7 times less likely to contract HIV, as those who receive little or no education. - ONE, 2013

Indoor cooking

using traditional solid fuels cause up to 2 million deaths a year. - IEG, 2008

Lack of access to clean water

and sanitation kills approximately 100 children every hour. - UNICEF, WHO, 2009

On average, health clinics

with electricity are open 1 hour longer each day. - IEG, 2008

Rural electrification results

in a fertility reduction of 0.6 children - equivalent to a benefit of $100 per household. - IEG, 2008

The number of people

relying on biomass energy like wood and charcoal in Africa is expected to increase by a 1000% between 2000 and 2030. - UNIDO, 2009

Q & A

Q & A
  • What is Wind for Prosperity all about?

    Wind for Prosperity, which carries endorsements from the UN and several global opinion leaders, is an innovative, commercially-based business model to bring affordable and reliable electricity to rural populations that currently lack it. Founded on Vestas’ unique knowledge within wind combined with 3rd party insights on underserved community, Wind for Prosperity deploys wind hybrid power systems that create a new opportunity for business, government, and financial institutions to combine their talents to improve people’s lives. As one of the biggest corporate initiatives to combat energy poverty and deploy green technology in developing countries, Wind for Prosperity is business as a force for good.

  • Why is Wind for Prosperity relevant?

    Upwards of 1.3 billion people across the globe currently lack access to affordable and reliable electricity – with dramatic consequences for human health, education, and economic wellbeing. But more than 50 million of those live in areas with abundant wind resources. Wind for Prosperity creates a world of new opportunities to provide clean water, healthcare, irrigation, educational opportunities, communications infrastructure, and other social and economic benefits for rural communities where such opportunities are now lacking or limited – and can do so on self-sustaining commercial terms.

  • Why is Wind for Prosperity relevant?

    Wind for Prosperity combines robust, proven wind technology with advanced diesel power generation to create hybrid systems that are well-suited for operation on mini-grids in remote locations with limited infrastructure. The turbines are easy to transport and erect; and are reliable and easy to maintain. Vestas utilizes its huge data processing capabilities to identify energy-deprived but wind-rich areas where the hybrid power generation solution can be installed. The solution is affordable and based on proven technology. Where wind conditions are good and a reliable distributor can be identified, it can form the basis of commercial electricity supply backed with private investments.

  • Where will the first Wind for Prosperity projects be built?

    The first Wind for Prosperity projects are expected to be in Kenya, but with the MoU between Vestas and EP Global Energy, Wind for Prosperity is broadening its reach and looking to deploy more or less simultaneously in Kenya and Jordan. A number of potential sites are currently being assessed in Jordan, but Wind for Prosperity in Kenya will center on up to 13 Kenyan communities that are home to more than 200,000 people. The projects are expected to supply electricity at around 30% below the current cost of diesel generation; and when fully implemented, reduce diesel fuel use by more than 2,000 tons per year. The Kenyan projects are being developed on fully commercial terms together with a global investor in collaboration with Kenyan authorities. Wind for Prosperity is expected to bring the same benefits to Jordanian communities and thus support Jordan’s goal of becoming energy independence while lowering CO2 emissions.

    Wind for Prosperity is founded on a unique combination of Vestas’ leading expertise within wind data analysis and global data on underserved communities. Through the combination of these, additional opportunities are being explored in countries such as Ethiopia, Tanzania, Indonesia and Pakistan.

  • Why is Vestas putting so much focus on the energy access challenge and launching a program like Wind for Prosperity?

    Wind energy markets are rebounding following the post-2008 economic downturn, though in a different shape and form. Many of the biggest wind markets are stagnating, while growth shifts to emerging markets. Wind for Prosperity is a key element in Vestas’ new Profitable Growth strategy – building on Vestas’ well-known strength in mature markets, while at the same time growing profitably in the emerging markets where Vestas does business and deliver value-based selling to its customers. Wind for Prosperity can help build reputation, relationships and experience in emerging markets, which require a different engagement model to open opportunities.

  • Who else is involved in Wind for Prosperity?

    Wind for Prosperity is supported by the following partners, without whom the ambitious vision of reaching 50 million people in energy poverty would not be possible: Masdar – Abu Dhabi’s renewable energy company, the Carbon War Room - an international NGO and think tank working on issues regarding market-based solutions to climate change, Econet Wireless – a diversified telecommunications group with operations and investments in Africa, Europe, South America and the East Asia Pacific Rim, and Frontier Investment Management.

    The Kenyan pilot projects are being jointly developed by Vestas, the pan-African renewable energy power project investor Frontier Investment Management www.frontier.dk, and a local development partner. This group is working closely with the Kenyan Ministry of Energy, Kenya Power and Light Company, and various government agencies to prepare the first installations, expected later in 2014.

  • Which technology will be used?

    Wind for Prosperity will deploy cost-effective wind hybrid power systems to remote communities based on proven energy technology. Vestas wind turbines will provide the renewable energy. The wind turbines will operate on mini-grids and be integrated with grid stabilization technologies that address the intermittent nature of wind power.

  • Which wind turbine models will be used?

    Based on specific analysis of wind data from community to community, Vestas will deploy the most suitable turbine based on wind speeds and infrastructure. As an example, the Vestas V47-660kw will be deployed for the first Kenya projects, as these turbines lend themselves well to operating in regions with limited infrastructure. They are easy to transport and erect, and are reliable and easy to maintain. There is also ample availability of these turbines in the after- market.

  • What is your basis for concluding that Wind for Prosperity can reach at least 50 million people?

    Wind for Prosperity targets underserved rural populations, which often rely primarily on diesel generators for what power they have, which is expensive and polluting. It also targets communities that can be well-served by wind hybrids on mini-grids as opposed to grid extensions or household solar units, for example. The estimate is calculated using Vestas wind data and IEA statistics for approximately 80 countries around the world. Vestas uses its market-leading wind simulation capabilities to estimate the share of each country’s surface area that has good wind conditions, defined as seven meters per second or above. This fraction has been applied to IEA’s estimate of the total rural population without access to electricity, assuming this population is evenly distributed across the country. Half of this population is then the Wind for Prosperity target population based on IEA’s estimate that the installation of mini-grids will be the most economically viable way to serve 50% of rural populations that don’t have access to electricity today.

    As an example, the Wind for Prosperity target population in Kenya is estimated at 3 million people. IEA estimates the rural population without access to electricity at 30.3 million; and Vestas estimates the surface area with wind speeds above 7 m/s at 21%. Wind hybrid power systems are thus relevant for 21% of the mini-grids that will be the preferred electrification option for 50% of 30.3 million people, or approximately 3 million people.

  • Is 50 million really that impressive, as it is a small fraction of the 1.3 billion people without access to electricity?
    Wind for Prosperity offers a practical technology solution and a commercially-based business model. It complements other efforts because it is relevant for remote communities that are the hardest to reach with grid infrastructure extensions. That is why this initiative has the potential to be scaled up and make an important difference. The campaign to reach universal access to sustainable energy by 2030 needs practical solutions – and that’s exactly what Wind for Prosperity offers.
  • Why is Africa the first deployment region?

    Africa today has the lowest per capita access to and the highest cost of electricity generation. At the same time, the continent has exceptional wind energy resources.

  • How is Wind for Prosperity different from other rural electrification initiatives? Why are you confident it will succeed?

    In the first instance, Vestas has developed a global map identifying communities where commercially-based electrification based on wind energy is feasible. This has never been done before. Vestas’ wind simulation technology enables detailed zoom-in assessments of potential communities without the need for wind measurements – this saves significant development time, effort, and resources.

    Second, the wind turbines particularly well-suited for these areas of limited infrastructure are only recently beginning to come onto the after-market, which makes this type of deployment feasible, both technologically and economically.

    Third, we have put considerable efforts into optimizing the transportation and installation process without compromising quality to provide a uniquely reliable and affordable solution to remote communities with good wind resources. Where a reliable distributor can be identified we believe our solution can form part of a fully commercial electricity generation model. In more challenging settings, such as refugee camps and politically unstable regions our solution offers will make donor funds stretch further.

  • How much has Vestas invested in bringing Wind for Prosperity to life?

    The initiative has been funded out of Vestas’ marketing budget for new markets. Development costs are roughly in line with the cost of a regular media campaign. Wind for Prosperity constitutes a relatively small share of Vestas’ annual marketing budget. We expect this to be a successful investment helping Vestas open new markets and build the global reputation of our industry

  • How is Wind for Prosperity linked to the United Nations’ “Sustainable Energy for All” program?

    Wind for Prosperity is registered under the United Nations’ “Sustainable Energy for All” call to action and is in that regard a tangible and scalable example of how clean, reliable electricity can become available to all.

  • Is Wind for Prosperity also relevant in the underserved developing countries?

    Wind for Prosperity is relevant in many low income countries where there are rural populations with abundant wind resources but without access to electricity. There are some countries where conditions for doing business are particularly difficult and where policies do not allow for the participation of the private sector in the provision of electricity. In these settings, the model with private investors will not be viable but wind hybrid systems can still be deployed by donor funding or other public or charitable funding sources.

  • Vestas is just beginning to show positive results from the two-year turn-around. Shouldn’t you concentrate on your core business instead of saving underserved people around the world?

    Wind for Prosperity is a cornerstone of Vestas' new Profitable Growth strategy – building on Vestas’ well-known strength in mature markets, while at the same time growing profitably in the emerging markets where Vestas does business and deliver value-based selling to its customers. Thus Wind for Prosperity can help open and develop new markets, and the project itself will generate small but profitable sales for Vestas, primarily through selling our combined wind-diesel solution and wind data. The concept is commercially-based and thus more sustainable than efforts based on philanthropy, traditional development assistance or CSR motivations. That we provide a solution with the potential to improve the lives of millions of people in developing countries is something we are proud of. Wind for Prosperity is business as a force for good.

Media

Media
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  • Videos
  • Documents

About the Data

About the Data

Wind for Prosperity identifies approximately 80 countries where many rural communities live in energy poverty with abundant wind resources.

The data behind this information comes from several sources; the International Energy Agency (IEA), the World Bank and Vestas' own wind data.

The IEA provides data on electricity access of the world's population, while the World Bank reports on economic and social facts.

Vestas uses its market-leading wind simulation capabilities to estimate the share of each country's surface area
that has good wind conditions, defined as seven metres per second or above

View the Data >
  • International Energy Agency (IEA)

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) is an autonomous organisation which works to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 member countries and beyond. The IEA's four main areas of focus are: energy security, economic development, environmental awareness, and engagement worldwide.

    Read More >
  • World Bank

    The World Bank is an international financial institution that provides loans to developing countries for capital programs. The World Bank's official goal is the reduction of poverty. Founded in 1944 to reconstruct war-torn Europe, the World Bank works in more than 100 developing countries.

    Read More >
  • Global wind data from Vestas' Plant Solutions

    SiteHunt® is an advanced analytical tool that examines a broad spectrum of wind and weather data to evaluate potential sites and establish which of them can provide the optimum conditions.

    Learn More >